Hobbit Day & Tolkien Week!

bilbo and frodo

If you think of September as a month that brings an end to the joys of summer, I’d say you’re right (if you live in the Northern Hemisphere, that is).

Schools start, flu & colds re-emerge, the days get shorter and the weather gets more unpredictable.

It also marks the beginning of a long wait until winter, the Festive Season and the release of a particular film …

In short, being in September sucks (though October is probably worse).
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Revealed! New Hobbit Banner …

The Hobbit The Battle of the Five Armies Banner Scroll (header)

“Air! I need air!”

Anyone else?

I’m channelling Bofur’s lines here, from The Desolation of Smaug because that is exactly what I’m going through right now.

Unlike the dwarf however, who found himself trapped in the claustrophobic entanglement of Mirkwood Forest, mine is out of pure joy after seeing the just-released banner scroll for The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies.

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My #HobbitFanContest Video Submission

In an embarrassing turn of events, I have forced myself to face the camera and submit my own contribution to the Hobbit Fan Contest.

This was fun to do, and no doubt there’s no chance of me becoming one of the 75 finalists.

Yet, I really enjoyed writing this piece of poetry – filming it, no so much! Continue reading

Rumours of Thráin …

**Warning: possible minor spoilers from The Hobbit**

> Who is this Thráin?

You know, that crazy dwarf – king-to-be character – which was supposed to make an appearance in The Desolation of Smaug – but clearly didn’t.

Upon seeing the first two films in The Hobbit trilogy, Thráin II (son of Thrór, father of Thorin Oakenshield) appears to be a rather key ingredient in the whole narrative – despite his lack of Thráin IIparticipation in the story.
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Concluding ‘The Fall of Arthur’ ~ The Writing Begins …

Fall of Arthur

A few weeks back I reported the possibility of seeing the completion of Tolkien’s The Fall of Arthur, here.

I expressed my desire in trying and create my own “fan fiction” and expand on the poem’s narrative – by closely following Christopher Tolkien’s notes on the various abandoned sketches his father never completed. Continue reading

Approaching Tolkien – Beowulf: A Translation & Commentary

The Anglo-Saxon Epic Receives Treatment from the Anglo-Saxon Professor

If you’ve read your fair share of Tolkien, at some point in your reading you would certainly have comes across numerous references highlighting the author’s fascination towards Anglo-Beowulf cover by JRR TolkienSaxon culture and literature.

Beowulf, made up of three thousand lines written in the Old English metre, remains the single most important work of the period.

But as expressive and fluent as the language is in the original language, many scholars have attempted to translate it into Modern English in the hope of capturing the same spirit and style of the poem: as it was intended to be read. Continue reading