Reflection on a Tolkien Quote

sea

And it is said by the Eldar that in water there lives yet the echo of the Music of the Ainur more than in any substance else that is in this Earth; and many of the Children of Ilúvatar hearken still unsated to the voices of the Sea, and yet know not for what they listen.
The Silmarillion, ‘Ainulindalë’

What an alluring way to describe the qualities of the Sea. Beautiful and terrifying at the same time, the Sea is essentially the foundation of our world. There is a mystery in the unfathomable depths of the ocean and a musicality to the waves hitting the shores. Continue reading

Tolkien’s Trip to the Moon

A Trip to the Moon

Inspiration from Georges Méliès …

I recently re-read Tolkien’s short story Roverandom, in which a dog is transformed into a toy and is sent on a fantastical trip to the moon and under the depths of the sea.

In many ways, it struck me how reminiscent the descriptions of the environment were to A Trip to the Moon (1902) and The Mermaid (1904): two historic films pioneered by director Georges Méliès.

The 1902 work of art, synonymous with the bullet-shaped spaceship hitting the man in the moon, is certainly not an exact word-to-image description from Tolkien’s story. Yet, that sense of imagination from two world creators, not yet aware of the bareness of Earth’s natural satellite, had conjured up strikingly similar visuals for what they thought an explorer would encounter on the moon. Continue reading

The Men of the Sea: Part I

The first of an article in two parts I had written a while back …

The Númenórean fleet and the voyages throughout Arda

1.0 Introduction

The Númenóreans were, without any doubt, not only the greatest mortal beings, but also the finest mariners in the Second Age. Their skills in the building of ships and Seatheir voyages across the vast seas of the world were unsurpassed by any other race. This article will give a glimpse into the workings of their fleet and how it was organized. Also, it will look into the innumerable navigations that the men of Númenor undertook throughout the wide oceans. I shall be looking mainly at a span of 1523 years: from the first Númenórean ships to arrive in Middle-Earth, until the death of Tar-Minastir, when they began “failing” as a race.
Continue reading