Fun Post: Scatha the Worm (Smaug’s brother?)

Scatha.jpg

Image by Jeff Murray (JeffMurray.com)

Between Tolkien’s three major Middle-earth works, there is a small number of references to dragons, but even less so have been attributed with particular names or involved in specific events.

Scatha the Worm is one of those rare named dragons about whom we know almost nothing, but this presents an excellent opportunity to analyse and speculate briefly. Continue reading “Fun Post: Scatha the Worm (Smaug’s brother?)”

Beowulf: The Lost King of Rohan

Beowulf A Translation and Commentary (header)

An Anglo-Saxon Connection

The Anglo-Saxon epic has been acknowledged many times as one of the major sources of inspiration for J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings. The world in the poem is easily comparable to Rohan and beyond. The character of Beowulf himself has been placed under scrutiny and analysed alongside other characters from Middle-earth, including Aragorn and Bard the Bowman.

The Geat hero, however, shares a close affinity with the majority of the kings of Rohan. Indeed, one could argue that many of the qualities and characteristics found in the House of Eorl can be attributed to Beowulf as an individual. The events that shape his life can be gleamed from the lives of Théoden’s ancestors.

For the purpose of this article, I will be using Tolkien’s recently published: Beowulf: A Translation and Commentary, in order to reference specific passages in relation to the character. I have also compared them with the text in The Lord of the Rings, with strong emphasis on ‘The House of Eorl’ in Appendix A. Continue reading “Beowulf: The Lost King of Rohan”

Reading a Tolkien Passage: Help!

Middle-earth map help

I may have written some tips on how to tackle Tolkien’s works, but that doesn’t mean I’m an expert – in any way. On the contrary, I’m still in the learning stages and there comes a time where even I find myself in difficulty reading his texts.

Case in point is the section ‘Farewell to Lorien’, from The Fellowship of the Ring. Halfway through the chapter, Celeborn advises a possible route for the Company to take .

Continue reading “Reading a Tolkien Passage: Help!”

Music from Middle-earth – Shore’s Genius

The slow, but gradual, spine-tingling sensation slowly creeps up on you … your heart beats faster … adrenaline rushes through your system … a flood of emotions attempts to escape from your own being …. 

It might sound like something out of a raunchy novel, but that’s a pretty accurate physical description of what happens whilst listening to soundtracks … particular soundtracks for LOTR FOTR Complete Recordingsthat matter.
Continue reading “Music from Middle-earth – Shore’s Genius”

Book Review: The Real Middle-earth

This post is dedicated to a book review – the first-ever on this blog.

I was privileged enough to be approached by author Michael Muhling and asked to do a review of his new book on Tolkien’s inspiration for Middle-earth. I jumped at the opportunity and after having read the work, I can now share my thoughts on it here.

The Real Middle-earth: Discovering the Origin of The Lord of the Rings, by Michael Muhling is an in-depth analysis into the history and central figures of Abyssinia (modern-day Michael-Muhling-coverEthiopia); reflecting on these aspects as being a possible source of inspiration for the major locations, cultures (and characters) in The Lord of the Rings.
Continue reading “Book Review: The Real Middle-earth”

Approaching Tolkien: ‘Unfinished Tales’

– Connecting the dots …

I’ve always looked at the ‘Unfinished Tales’ as one stocky appendix book, containing all the intricate information (in prose form) that could not possibly fit at the back of ‘The Silmarillion’ and ‘The Lord of the Rings’.ut

It goes without saying but here it goes (… with the saying). This book should only be read AFTER you’ve gone through all three major books.
Continue reading “Approaching Tolkien: ‘Unfinished Tales’”