The Lay of the Children of Húrin … in Sindarin

Sindarin translation -b The Children of Hurin (header)

Tolkien + Poem + Sindarin = Epic 

Every once in a while comes a long a proper piece of dedicated fan work. This week I was introduced to the extraordinary work being undertaken by fan, Cillendor Edenion.

The ambitious project attempts to translate Tolkien’s ‘The Lay of the Children of Húrin’ into Sindarin; or more specifically, Neo-Sindarin.

Check it out for yourselves … Continue reading

TTRT: The Silmarillion – Chapter Twenty-One

Turin slays Beleg (header)

Tolkien as a “Dark Fantasy” Author

Way back in time, when this blog was but a few days old, I wrote a two-part post (Part I & Part II) on why I considered Tolkien might be categorised under the sub-literary branch of “dark fantasy”.

‘Of Túrin Turambar’ is the second of the Great Tales in The Silmarllion. Undoubtedly, it is also the greatest (both in terms of length and detailed narrative composition).

It’s a dark tale full of ups and downs (with certainly more downs than ups); where a glimmer of hope in the story turns out to be nothing more than an illusion.

It can also be a tough read at first. Thankfully, it’s a standalone story within The Silmarillion narrative and only a few past events and characters bear upon this chapter in any real way.

If you’ve read the previous chapter (‘Of the Fifth Battle: Nirnaeth Arnoediad’) then you’re on the right track; the consequences of that battle are a direct influence on the successive events.

I’m sure you’re aware of the recent publication The Children of Húrin: a significantly expanded version of the chapter found in The Silmarillion. If you’re new to this story, I suggest you go through the chapter first and then proceed to reading the full tale once you’ve grasped the concept of the story.

In the meantime, here’s my own pitiful summary (spoilers ahead). Continue reading

TTRT: The Silmarillion – Chapter Twenty

Nirnaeth Arnoediad (header)

The Near-Annihilation of Elves, Men and Dwarves

With a chapter whose Elvish title can be translated as “Unnumbered Tears”, a reader can only expect one outcome from the battle that unfolds.

The pages recounting the Nirnaeth Arnoediad have always been special to me. Finally, after the conflicts and bickering among Elves, Dwarves and Men, the three races join forces to repel Morgoth once and for all.

It’s undoubtedly a major moment in the history of the First Age, and a highlight in The Silmarillion. It also marks Tolkien’s acute sense of geography, scale and mayhem. Continue reading

Middle-earth’s Best Mums

Morwen (TTT)

Celebrating Mother’s Day!

It’s Mother’s Day in this part of the world (and in many other parts), so it’s only natural to dedicate a nice post on the subject.

There are many strong female characters in the histories of Middle-earth who have given birth and raised equally important characters.

In honour of Mother’s Day, we will take a look at the finest examples of motherhood in Tolkien’s fantasy world (books only).

At the same time, I take this opportunity to wish all real-world mothers out there my best wishes and thumbs up for the awesome job you do 😉

Oh and now’s the time to put a -Spoiler Alert!- If you haven’t yet read The Silmarillion or Unfinished Tales (The Lord of the Rings seems to lack in mothers) proceed with extra caution…

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The Tale of the Dagor Dagorath

Constructing the account of the Dagor Dagorath –

the Last Battle of Arda

Introduction

Many mythologies in literature make several references to their own interpretation of events related to the end of the world. No different is the case in J.R.R. Tolkien’s own fantasy world. Clues are to be found sparsely scattered in some of his major works – hinting at the end of the world and the rebuilding of Arda. Continue reading

Approaching Tolkien: ‘The Children of Húrin’

– The stand-alone storycoh

‘The Children of Húrin’ is one of the oldest narratives in Tolkien’s legendarium, being also one of the three Great Tales of the First Age – along with ‘Beren and Lúthien’ and ‘The Fall of Gondolin’.
Continue reading