Christopher Tolkien and Other Farewells

Christopher Tolkien

Photo by Charles E. Noad

For a number of years I used to think what would happen once the son and literary heir of J.R.R Tolkien would be with us no more. I questioned what would that mean to the Tolkien community, whether the experience of reading the books would change, and what would it mean for future scholarly work and publications. Continue reading “Christopher Tolkien and Other Farewells”

Approaching Tolkien: The Fall of Gondolin

The Fall of Gondolin.pngFollowing the same editorial structure employed in Beren and Lúthien, Christopher Tolkien’s new publication offers readers a detailed look at the evolution of the writing that was to become the main narrative behind the story of Gondolin.

The book presents several iterations of Tuor’s story — the lone man in search of the Hidden City, and his adventures before and during its fall. As with the preceding publication, there is no new material to adorn this book, although The Fall of Gondolin does present the various scattered stories found in The Book of Lost Tales and Unfinished Tales within one collection. Continue reading “Approaching Tolkien: The Fall of Gondolin”

Debating Tolkien’s Magnum Opus

The Silmarillion_4

Stephen King has The Dark Tower series. George Orwell has 1984. Dante Alighieri’s The Divine Comedy is the author’s own unparalleled piece of writing.

“Magnum Opus” (translated from Latin as “masterpiece”) is a term that can be applied to virtually any piece of art or literature that has somehow had a significant impact upon those who experience it, and was brought about by a sophisticated, high standard and excellent creative impulse on the part of its creator. Continue reading “Debating Tolkien’s Magnum Opus”

Salmar: The Forgotten Maia

Salmar

Researching and Speculating on Tolkien

As I have often remarked on this blog, one of the great things about Tolkien’s works is the large number of mysteries and questions he has left unanswered; mysteries that can be picked up by any reader and researched to their heart’s content: looking for clues and cross-referencing over the thousands of pages of Middle-earth material, trying to dig up further information.

You may have read The Silmarillion numerous times and yet, with every new read, you discover something new. I know this because it happens to me. It has happened to me right now as I’m beginning my 10th or 11th re-read of the book and came across the oft forgotten character of Salmar. Continue reading “Salmar: The Forgotten Maia”

Concluding ‘The Fall of Arthur’ ~ The Writing Begins …

Fall of Arthur

A few weeks back I reported the possibility of seeing the completion of Tolkien’s The Fall of Arthur, here.

I expressed my desire in trying and create my own “fan fiction” and expand on the poem’s narrative – by closely following Christopher Tolkien’s notes on the various abandoned sketches his father never completed. Continue reading “Concluding ‘The Fall of Arthur’ ~ The Writing Begins …”

A good day to love Tolkien!

Exciting news ahead …

I smell the covers of a new Tolkien book on the way! 🙂

Such a phrase is rarely heard nowadays. However, it seems like a feast considering we’ve just had The Fall of Arthur released barely a year ago.Beowulf cover by JRR Tolkien

Indeed, word had just come out that the Tolkien Estate (in association with Harper Collins) will publish J.R.R. Tolkien’s own translation of the Anglo-Saxon epic, Beowulf.

The book will be available on May 22nd, this year.
Continue reading “A good day to love Tolkien!”