My Tolkien Collection: Hardbacks

Hardbacks

– The “Intermediaries”

I affectionately refer to hardbacks as “intermediaries” and certainly not in a negative way – far from it. I consider hardbacks to be one step ahead in the evolutionary process of a book. From being a paperback, it has taken a giant leap towards achieving Deluxe status and beyond!

My oh my! I DO make myself sound crazy after all …

Colourful dust-jackets, deluxe-like covers and pretty much the general vibe that surrounds standard hardbacks is simply elusive.

From the above picture, you must be wondering why on earth I’ve got two copies of ‘On Fairy Stories’ … well, that was a slight technical mishap were I accidentally requested two, rather than one.

(Ah well, I can always use one copy to write some pencil notes on … never!)

And here’s another image of the rest of the hardbacks …

Hardbacks2

Please ignore the copy of ‘The Chronicles of Narnia’ for now, which serves shamefully (I admit) as a resting tool.  I shall be dedicating a post to it (and other books) soon …

You may notice the three-volume set of ‘The History of Middle-earth’. I’m really glad I have acquired it, but at the same time, can’t help feeling disgruntled at the fact that I had to buy the books separately, rather than the entire set in a nice slipcase. Unfortunately, the latter was sold out and only after I had bought the books individually, was the slipcase made available again … ahhh!

Also, you can just make out the shape of yet another book behind the HoME series (i.e. ‘The History of Middle-earth’) … it’s ‘The Art of the Hobbit’ by Wayne G. Hammond & Christina Scull. the art of the hobbitNaturally, the book deserves a better placement upon a shelf rather than at the back – but due to the size and square-shape of the book, it could not fit as comfortable as the others!

Therefore, I had to find a more suitable position to place it in. Although it’s not clearly visible, it’s still there with all its other hearty companions …

Out of all these hardbacks I have to admit that ‘The Children of Húrin’ stands out as my most prized and favourite of the lot. Being my first ever hardback, 1st edition, Middle-earth-related book, it reminds me of the moment I began to  seriously start collecting Tolkien.

Hence, this book will always mark the beginning of something very special in my life …

(Next … the trusty paperbacks!)

 

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6 thoughts on “My Tolkien Collection: Hardbacks

  1. “The doom lies in yourself, not in your name.” Fate and the Self-fulfilling prophecy in The Children of Hurin | The Leather Library says:

    […] My Tolkien Collection: Hardbacks (atolkienistperspective.wordpress.com) […]

  2. Hi, I was wondering whether the maps in the 50th anniversary hardbacks of Fellowship, Two Towers, and Return of the King were like the maps in the one-volume deluxe slipcased edition where they only extend sideways and not up past the top of the book like some other editions. Perhaps you could help me with this? Thanks! (Your shelves look awesome btw.)

    • Hi Florence, thanks for the question 🙂

      I’m afraid I only own the single-volume edition; but I believe the maps in the separate volumes also extend sideways.

      The ones that open up into four folds belong to the much older versions and they were maps printed on a separate piece of paper (I’m referring to the Gondor/Mordor map) and then attached to the book.

      Nowadays, the print and bind the book with the text and maps altogether.

      Then again, I stand to be corrected, but as far as I know that’s how it is.

      Hope it helps, and thanks once again! 🙂

  3. […] My Tolkien Collection: Hardbacks (atolkienistperspective.wordpress.com) […]

  4. I don’t know if you have it since you have submitted information regarding your colelction, but I think that you should really consider to include this work: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_History_of_The_Hobbit

    It’s in the vein of the History of the Middle Earth series, I’m currently reading it and enjoying it very much. It goes quite deep in describing influential elements, how it relates – or not relate to the other works of Tolkien and how the process of creating The Hobbit went from first typescript to final publications. 🙂

    • As a matter of fact I have the paperback editions, do I haven’t read it yet.

      Thanks for the heads up though, I must find myself some time to tackle it now 😀

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